April 14, 1944
Un-numbered

Dear Folksies,

          Our Officers Club and Bar is still a popular hangout and Pete Joseph keeps the varied liquor supply always plentifully on hand. Besides the usual local drinks of cognac, vermouth, brandy, etc. we even go in for such funny things as Planter’s Punch, Crème de Menthe frappe, Tom & Jerries and even the other afternoon some rather potent Mint Juleps. They always have eggs on hand also and with the little electric plate, we frequently fry ourselves a couple of eggs on toast before turning in to bed.

          Another thing we’ve had that I don’t ever remember having seen, or at least not so plentifully, and that is “blood oranges”. They are far better tasting than the regular oranges and their juice is a tomato-red color and, too, has a better taste than juice from ordinary oranges – and certainly a far better taste than canned orange juice.

           Our diet, too, has changed somewhat as the months go by. The quartermaster has begun to buy more and more of the local products, such as fresh vegetables, and our dinner table has been graced on several occasions with very good lettuces! Yes, we had some while we were in Africa – but really only once when the Navy came over with one hold full of nice Salinas lettuce. Not that this lettuce here isn’t good, for it is, and is a most welcome change from all the G.I. canned stuff that we get day in and day out. Somehow the boys are not too imaginative in the preparation of those things and they get to be rather monotonous. Eggs range from 8 to 11 cents apiece and as a consequence we do not have them at meals, except on occasions when officers and nurses chip in to give us fried eggs for breakfast. Of course, at the Club we pay for each one we eat – but then there is something about having them for breakfast that is different, and the Club is not open in the A.M.

                                                                                         Loads of love,

rene-transparent

.

Watch for my next letter
April 18, 1944

(Left to right) Russell Klein, Rudolpho and another bartender, Gus Stola, Pete Joseph, Eddie Welles and Elmer Chappell (Chappie).

Pete Joseph keeps the varied liquor supply always plentifully on hand at the Officers Club and Bar.

René (center) with Marv Hodgson (left)  and Cy Kiernan (right) at the Officers’ Club